Is F1 finally getting a hold in the US?

Formula 1 has a 70-year tradition of being at the top of the sporting world. Globally recognised and with races held throughout the world, it is hugely popular. It is therefore surprising that until now, it has had little impact in the most powerful country on Earth. Here is a look at the sport’s plans to conquer America.

European base

Although largely seen as an international organisation, Formula 1 has no place in the States. It all began in 1950 at Silverstone, where a 120,000-strong audience – including the then-king, George VI – cheered on Giuseppe Farina as he drove his winning Alfa Romeo over the finishing line. Formula 1 has a 70-year tradition of being at the top of the sporting world. Globally recognised and with races held throughout the world, it is hugely popular.This spectator excitement still exists today, enjoyed by thousands at Paddock Club areas the world over. It is therefore surprising that until now, it has had little impact in the most powerful country on Earth. Here is a look at the sport’s plans to conquer America.


Why not America?

Most F1 races take place in Europe, making it difficult for Americans to travel and view. The US also has its own motor sports to watch, some of which have been around longer than Formula 1.

Although many Europeans enjoy the sport – visit edgeglobalevents.com/f1-paddock-club/ to see how it is done in style – logistically, this is impossible for most Americans. It’s also fairly challenging timewise as most races would begin very early in US time, making it difficult to encourage viewing or get-togethers. There is also the issue of the lack of American drivers; the last one to win a race was Mario Andretti at the 1978 Dutch Grand Prix.

Changes afoot

The future of Formula 1 in the US looks set to be a bit brighter. Competitor NASCAR is proving to be less popular lately, and following a change in leadership in 2017, F1 is now owned by a US company, Liberty Media. F1 is now owned by a US company, Liberty Media. Indeed, Chase Carey, its new CEO, is keen to develop the sport to appeal to more Americans.

In 2019, a Grand Prix circuit in Miami will take place, in addition to the US Grand Prix. There are also rumours that New Jersey may host a race in the future.

There are also the finances to consider. In 2016 alone, Americans – 325 million of them – paid a phenomenal $56 billion to attend sporting events. However, with no American drivers at present, the possibility of an American breakthrough might not be quite ready to take off.